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Animal Rescue Update: Third Seal Admitted

There are now three seals receiving rehabilitative care at our Animal Care and Rescue Center!

Published March 11, 2020

On February 27, National Aquarium Animal Rescue transported a stranded juvenile grey seal from Assateague State Park to our Animal Care and Rescue Center in Jonestown. The seal, later nicknamed Huckleberry Finn, is being treated for dehydration and external wounds.

Pippi Longstocking and Huckleberry Finn

Seal stewards from the Maryland Coastal Bays Program monitored Huck as he rested on the beach for two days. When the seal began to show signs of degraded health, our Animal Rescue team was called in for response. At the beach, the team immediately confirmed Huck’s ailments and transferred him back to Baltimore for care. He’s currently receiving a regimen of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications.

After spending a few days recovering in a dry triage space, Huck is currently rooming with grey seal pup Pippi Longstocking in one of our seal rehabilitation suites while harp seal Amelia Bedelia takes temporary residence in our other suite and continues to heal from her injuries!

Pippi Longstocking and Huckleberry Finn

Pippi has been in our care since early February; she is still receiving antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications, and her condition continues to improve significantly. She recently began eating on her own, which is a sign that her rehabilitation is going well! Given she is estimated to be only about eight weeks old, she has a lot of growing to do at this stage in her life. Our team is excited to see her continue to gain weight while in rehabilitation.

Amelia Bedelia and a puzzle feeder

Amelia Bedelia—rescued from Ocean City, Maryland, in late February—completed her medical and fluid treatments and is eating on her own. She’s at a more advanced stage of rehabilitation and can enjoy lots of playtime with enrichment items! Objects like the puzzle feeder challenge Amelia’s foraging skills and provide great practice for feeding in her native habitat.

Be sure to follow us on social for the latest news regarding our rescue patients!

Learn more about seal rescue and rehabilitation!

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