Help Preserve the Endangered Species Act

The Endangered Species Act has supported work that has prevented the extinction of 99 percent of the species it has protected. That work is now under threat.

Published September 12, 2018

The bald eagle, the humpback whale and the American alligator are among the species that have been brought back from the brink of extinction thanks to environmental protection efforts put in place through the Endangered Species Act. And there is no shortage of success stories.

Humpback whale

Credit: Robert Burke

In a new proposal, key aspects of the Endangered Species Act would be scaled back, putting treasured species and protected ecosystems at risk. The proposed changes include lifting blanket protections for threatened species and possibly allowing economic considerations to affect species listing decisions, rather than solely relying on the best available science.

Changes may also limit the ability to consider the impacts of climate change when deciding whether to list a species as threatened, as previously done when listing the polar bear as a threatened species.

Proposed regulatory changes like these that would weaken the Endangered Species Act could take effect without congressional approval and result in decreased protections for vulnerable species and the ecosystems they call home.

Join us in urging our federal officials to protect America's wildlife by opposing any measures to weaken the Endangered Species Act—pledge your support today.

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