Animal Rescue Update: Sea Turtle Week

In concert with World Sea Turtle Day and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Turtle Week, our Animal Rescue team is set to release two rehabilitated patients at Assateague Island National Seashore next week!

Published June 07, 2016

The two juvenile green sea turtles being released came to the National Aquarium in November 2015: 

Hardhead was rescued on the coast of Delaware by the MERR Institute and transferred to Baltimore for long-term rehabilitation.

hardhead

Hardhead arrived with a low body temperature, broken ribs and a tear in his lung that left him buoyant and unable to properly swim. Animal Science and Welfare staff carefully monitored his recovery and are happy to report that he is swimming normally and is ready for release! 

Beachcomber suffered a rare blood infection and kidney problems after stranding along the coast of Cape Cod.

beachcomber

Thanks to a round of antibiotics and assist-feeding by the Animal Science and Welfare team, he has returned to eating on his own and is healthy enough to return to his natural environment.

Our upcoming release will include 10 Kemp’s ridley sea turtles from the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium and the National Marine Life Center.

This release is a single moment in a landmark year for the Animal Rescue program, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. Since 1991, the team has successfully rescued, treated, and returned over 170 animals to their natural environment!

Just as momentous, the National Park Service, parent to Assateague Island National Seashore, is celebrating a milestone of its won this year—100 years of providing and preserving outdoor recreation environments.

The public is invited to join our teams at Assateague on the morning of June 16th to help us celebrate these incredible milestones. The turtles will be released on the National Park side of Assateague Island at 9:30 a.m. 

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