A Blue View: Re-creating Baltimore's Wetland Habitat

When natural shorelines are replaced by manmade structures, valuable ecosystem services can be lost.

Published May 17, 2016

floating-wetland

Floating wetland islands offer a solution for restoring those benefits traditionally provided by natural tidal wetlands. They help improve water quality, remove excess nutrients and provide important habitat for a variety of plants and animals—and a few are at work right here in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

The National Aquarium installed its first floating wetland back in 2010 and has continued the work ever since.

Though you may not see much movement below its murky surface, the Chesapeake Bay is teeming with life. A variety of fishes, such as the striped bass, northern pipefish and American eel, call the Bay home, as well as blue crabs, snakes, turtles and waterfowl. 

The diverse community of plants found on a floating wetland provides habitat and food for an array of Bay wildlife, while the underwater surface is an ideal substrate for aquatic animals to colonize.

For more on Baltimore’s floating wetlands, check out this week’s A Blue View podcast:

Previous Post

Featured Stories

dolphin-swimming Our Dolphins Embrace Change

Over the past few months, our marine mammal and animal health teams have been hard at work preparing our dolphins for their eventual relocation to our sanctuary.

Read the full story

leopard-shark-kelp-forest You Asked, We Answered: Do Sharks Make Noise?

Dolphins make clicking noises and whales emit deep, low hums to echolocate and communicate, but what about sharks?

Read the full story

Related Stories

Items You Didn’t Know You Could Recycle

Published November 15, 2017

How to Compost Your Pumpkins

Published November 04, 2017