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Animal Update: Baby Chromis in Blacktip Reef

Our 40 spiny chromis were born at the Steinhart Aquarium in their coral reef exhibit, and given to us in October. They went on display in December, and last week we discovered more juveniles!

Published June 10, 2016

Spiny chromis have direct development of their larvae, which means the parents protect their brood from the egg stage (which are laid on the reef), through hatching and onto the fully developed juvenile stage. 

There is no pelagic larval stage unlike the vast majority of coral reef fishes. This form of direct development means that the offspring often take up residence on the reef not far from where they were hatched.

adult-spmy-chromis

The species is unusual because it is one of only three pomacentrid species that do not have planktonic larvae. The larvae of all three species stay with the parents after hatching. Our juveniles are currently being fed baby brine shrimp and rotifers.

Stay tuned for more updates! 

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