Amazing Animal Moms!

Once again, we’d like to celebrate this year’s Mother’s Day weekend by introducing you to a few more amazing animal moms!

Published May 08, 2015

Linne’s Two-toed Sloths

Sloth babies have a close relationship to their mothers from birth, often clinging to their fur for warmth and protection. In fact, a mother will carry her young first on her belly and eventually on her back. Sloth mothers will only produce one offspring at a time and stay with their baby for up to one year. In most cases, the baby will become independent after about 15 months and the mother can then have another baby. 

Felize, a new sloth at the National Aquarium

Our Linne’s two-toed sloth, Ivy, just became a mother of three this year!  Her newest baby, Felize, was born on March 30, 2015. 

Atlantic Puffin

It’s a real team effort for puffin parents. Together, mom and dad create small grassy nests where the female will lay an egg. The incubation period lasts for about 40 days and involves both parents. During this process, the mother and father take turns keeping the egg warm under their wings. 

Atlantic Puffin

After birth, the parents will care for their offspring for another 40 days, providing food and protection from predators. Surprisingly, adult puffins can carry more than ten fish in their mouth at a time!

Reticulated Whiptail Ray

These mothers are known to give birth to 3 to 5 young each summer. The gestation period is lengthy, usually lasting about one year. 

Honeycomb Stingray

During this time, the mother will provide nourishment to its babies through “uterine milk,” which provides the nutrients that are essential to survival. When they are born, the babies emerge into the world tail first!

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