Celebrating Australia's Rich Ecosystems, Pt. 2

In honor of Australia Day (January 26), we’re virtually exploring some of the continent’s most diverse ecologically rich habitats!

Published January 20, 2015

The Outback

The Australian Outback may appear to be a vast expanse of barren land, but the sparse desert landscape is actually teeming with life.

Despite an arid appearance, the Outback is home to an incredible array of animals, from red kangaroos and cockatoos to finches, death adders and thorny devils.

Death Adder

Did you know? Seventeen of the world’s 26 most venomous snake species live in Australia. Death adders inject, on average, 40–100 mg of highly toxic venom in each bite.

River Gorges

Rivers millions of years old course through the Australian wilderness, carving gorges out of the dry, rocky land. Throughout the year, water levels fluctuate—at times the rivers are calm, at others they are marked by waterfalls and rapids.

Crocodiles are often spotted basking in the sun on the banks of these river gorges. A number of other species are also found in Australia's rivers.

Austalian freshwater crocodile

The country's largest river, the Murray, is home to emus, koalas, bearded dragons and a variety of fish, just to name a few.

Keep the celebration going, and join us at our Australian Wine Night on January 29!

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