Animal Update: Cannonball Jellies

Cannonball jellies are now on exhibit in Jellies Invasion!

Published August 28, 2015

cannonball-jelly

Image via Flickr user Greg McFall for NOAA's National Ocean Service.

The cannonball jellyfish, also known as the cabbage head jellyfish, can be found along the Atlantic coast of the Americas (from Maine to Brazil), in the eastern Pacific (from Southern California to Ecuador) and the western Pacific from the Sea of Japan to the South China Sea.

This species’ bell can reach up to 10 inches in diameter! Under their bells, cannonball jellies have a cluster of short oral arms. Like most species of jellies, cannonballs are armed with stinging nematocyst cells, which they can quickly activate in self-defense or to catch prey!

Stay tuned for more updates!

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