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Trawling for Trash in the Chesapeake Bay

Can this innovative research project help rid the Chesapeake Bay of harmful plastics?

Published November 10, 2014

5 Gyres and the Trash Free Maryland Alliance, two organizations committed to making our blue planet a cleaner, trash-free place, recently announced a new project aimed at better understanding the plastic pollution that’s plaguing our Bay.

On November 12th, their teams will embark on a multi-day trip aboard a 42-foot Sabre Sloop sailboat. The boat will be drafting a manta trawl, which will sample micro plastics and report on plastic types and density of all observed pieces in the Bay waters. Larger trash seen floating on the surface will also be surveyed by staff on-board. 

trash trawl

Image via 5 Gyres.

About Trash Free Maryland Alliance 

Founded in 2010, the Trash Free Maryland Alliance brings together organizations, businesses and individuals committed to reducing trash in Maryland’s environment. Whether they’re participating in a clean-up event or in the halls of state government buildings in Annapolis, the Alliance’s commitment to cleaning up Maryland has seen to great things for our state! 

About 5 Gyres

Based in Santa Monica, California, 5 Gyres is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to conduct research and communicate about the global impact of plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. They’re working hard to employ strategies that eliminate the accumulation of plastic pollution all 5 subtropical gyres. 

For real-time project updates, be sure to follow us on Twitter!

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