2014 Recap: Conservation Wins, Part Two

Published December 22, 2014

As 2014 begins to wind down, we are taking a look back at some of the year’s biggest conservation stories: 

Celebrating Fifteen Years at Fort McHenry

As the birthplace of our National Anthem, Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine is an important site for our nation’s history. 

fort mchenry

Since 1999, Aquarium staff and volunteers have dedicated their time to cleaning up and enhancing the natural areas around the Fort that provide habitat, food and shelter for an amazing variety of local wildlife.

In the last 15 years, our teams have collected close to 700,000 pieces of debris from the site. 

Saving Coral Reefs, One Transplant at a Time

In November, The New York Times reported on an innovative coral transplant project from the Mote Tropical Research Laboratory. 

Zebra Shark

Scientists down in Summerland Key, Florida have discovered a new technique called microfragmenting that makes it possible to mass-produce reef-building corals for transplanting onto dead or dying coral reefs. This new process is a big step forward for reef restoration!

Baltimore’s Innovative Trash Fighter

The Inner Harbor has a new crown jewel—a solar-powered water wheel capable of removing up to 50,000 pounds of trash from our local waterways in a given day. 

This innovative machine has collected over 50 tons of marine debris in its first few months of operation! 




Any big conservation wins you’re celebrating this year? Tell us about them in the comments section!

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