Meet Some of the Best Dads in the Animal Kingdom!

Published June 11, 2013

In celebration of Father's Day this weekend, meet some truly awesome animal dads!

Seahorses

longsnout seahorses

Male seahorses take on an interesting role when it comes to parenting. It is the male who becomes pregnant and delivers the babies! Seahorses have monogamous relationships, and the male cares for the unhatched eggs, regulating the conditions inside the pouch where the eggs are stored.

Arowanas

silver arowana

Arowana dads do a lot to take care of their little ones! A male arowana will build a nest for young fish, as well as protect them from harm. If his spawn are in danger, he’ll suck them up into his mouth to keep them from getting hurt.

Emperor Penguins

emperor penguin

Photo via National Geographic.

The male emperor penguin is a dedicated dad! After laying her egg, a penguin mom will return to the ocean for two months to fish. During that time, the male cradles the egg between his feet, taking care not to expose it to the elements. He does not eat until the mother returns!

Mouth Almighty

mouth almighty

When breeding, it is the male that will take up the female’s sack of eggs and incubate them in his mouth for about two weeks. After the eggs hatch, the developing fry will continue to stay in the safety of the male’s mouth for about another week. During this time, the male does not eat.

Golden Lion Tamarins

golden lion tamarin

Male golden lion tamarins are ever the attentive fathers! They will "co-parent" offspring with their mate and can often be observed carrying their young on their backs in between feedings.

Be sure to bring Dad to the Aquarium this weekend to meet some of these incredible animal parents in person! 

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