Thoughtful Thursdays: Supporting Urban Parks!

Published April 04, 2013

For more than a decade, our Aquarium Conservation Team (ACT!) of staff and volunteers has worked to restore habitat for wildlife and maintain the trails at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine in Baltimore.

fort mchenry before and after

Together, we've collected more than 600,000 pieces of debris! Our efforts at Fort McHenry are about more than just cleanup! Our work there includes everything from trail maintenance and light construction to planting native flowers and butterfly gardens.

All of these efforts add up to create a valuable green space in the heart of Baltimore City that is utilized by hundreds of species of birds, reptiles like box turtles and diamondback terrapins, and aquatic critters like juvenile blue crabs and small fish!

As part of a partnership with the National Parks Conservation Association and ioby, our cleanup at Fort McHenry has been selected as an urban park project worth crowdfunding! The term crowdfunding refers to a collective effort by individuals to financially support a certain initiative online.  Click here to support our efforts to restore habitat for wildlife, remove debris and maintain the trails at this National Monument!

The goal of this partnership is to finally take the support and advocacy for national parks into the digital age. We're proud to be a community partner for this pilot program and can only hope that this is one of MANY crowdfunding projects we see across the country. The beauty of programs like this is that even if you can't literally get your hands dirty, you can still contribute to causes YOU believe in!

Already supported our crowdfunding page on ioby's site? About to? Help us spread the word online! Share this link on your Facebook page or on Twitter using #UrbanParksIOBY! 

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