Animal Updates - April 13

Published April 13, 2012

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we're bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our WATERblog every Friday to find out what's going on... here's what's new this week!

Baby Spotted Lagoon Jellies
Mastigias papua 

Our jellies lab welcomed a special delivery from the Oklahoma Aquarium: baby lagoons! They're about a month and a half old right now, and we've never had this species this young before. Right now, they're developing and growing in our jellies lab, and once they reach about four or five months old they'll be big enough to go on exhibit.

Right now they look just like tiny blue blubber jellies, but as they grow, they'll develop spots and lose their bluish tint. Since they arrived, they've already started to sprout tentacles, and spots are appearing along the edges of the bells.

Quite a bit goes into giving these jellies what they need to grow and thrive. They have a high metabolism, so they're fed at least three times a day, sometimes more. These sun-loving jellies are kept under a special metal halide light, which is a different spectrum than regular lights. Spotted lagoon jellies have a symbiotic relationship with the algae that live in them; the algae need the light to photosynthesize, and the jellies eat the waste products the algae make in the process.

Breeding Season for Sand Tiger Sharks
Carcharias taurus
You may see staff members observing and monitoring the behavior of the sand tiger sharks in our Open Ocean exhibit. It's breeding season for these sharks, and sometimes the males can get a bit aggressive.

Did you know? Female sand tiger sharks do not have the expected single uterus – each female has two, and babies develop in both at the same time. In each separate uterus, the unborn pups eat each other and devour any still-unfertilized eggs until only one remains. Eventually one baby is born from each uterus – talk about survival of the fittest!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

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Picture this: You’ve just spent a wonderful, late summer week on Cape Cod, swimming in the ocean and enjoying the sunshine with friends and family. As fall sets in, you know it’s time to head home. You get on the highway, but something strange happens … despite driving for hours, you end up back where you started. You feel sluggish, confused and exhausted. If you were a turtle, you just might be cold-stunned.

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