Rehabilitated turtle prepares for release

Published January 23, 2009

In July, a loggerhead sea turtle came to the Aquarium through our National Aquarium Animal Rescue program, which takes in stranded marine animals with the goal of treating them back to health and releasing them back into their natural habitats.

 Upon arrival the turtle was thin and her shell was covered with barnacles, mussels, and a thick growth of algae. To assess the turtle's health, the Aquarium's veterinary staff needed to evaluate the condition of her shell and check for any internal disease.

For this very special case, the vets called on the help of outside healthcare professionals. The radiology staff at John's Hopkins Hospital stepped in to help. They volunteered their time and gave the Aquarium staff after hours access to their equipment, so the vets could get a good look at the turtles internal functions. Check out the video:

With the help of John's Hopkins, the Aquarium vets were able to determine some minor problems with the health of her shell and have been able to treat the condition.  The National Aquarium Animal Rescue team is now planning to transport the turtle to Florida in February for release into warmer waters.

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