Look, but don’t touch!

Published May 07, 2008

Anemones have stinging cells called nematocysts.Sea anemones and touch: The sea anemone’s acute sense of touch has two very important roles – feeding and protection. Tentacles surround the end of the anemone’s body and mouth and each is lined with nematocysts, or stinging cells. Small sensory hairs on these cells can detect even the slightest touches and subtlest vibrations in the water. When the anemone senses prey – or a potential predator – it triggers the release of venom-laden, harpoon-like structures, paralyzing the food or enemy! Only the clownfish is immune to the sea anemone’s sting.

 

Previous Post

Featured Stories

Animal Rescue Update: Harbor Seal Admitted

Our Animal Rescue staff is currently caring for a male harbor seal nicknamed Phil.

Read the full story

May is Garden for Wildlife Month!

Celebrate the return of warm weather with some time out in your home or community garden!

Read the full story

Related Stories

Animal Update: Australian Snapping Turtles

Published May 26, 2017

Animal Rescue Update: Phil’s Continued Care

Published May 24, 2017