City Nature Challenge Recap

Citizen scientists across the Baltimore region identified 902 species, 20 of which are threatened.

Published May 09, 2018

Citizen scientists from across the state set out to explore, identify and document urban wildlife over a four-day period in the National Aquarium’s inaugural year coordinating the City Nature Challenge in the Baltimore region. The City Nature Challenge is an international effort to find and document plants and wildlife in cities across the globe.

Black-crowned Night Heron in a tree

As the regional coordinator for 2018, the National Aquarium managed City Nature Challenge efforts in the Baltimore region, including Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Dorchester, Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties.

Between April 27 and April 30, 408 citizen scientists in the Baltimore region recorded a grand total of 5,734 iNaturalist observations.

During the challenge, 902 species were identified, 20 of which are threatened. It was the first time 222 of these species were recorded on iNaturalist in the Baltimore region. The most commonly reported plant species was the garlic mustard, while the American robin was the most-sighted animal.

Of 68 participating cities, Baltimore finished 24th in observations, 23rd in species and 13th in observers–a strong showing for the region’s first City Nature Challenge effort!

See the full list of species identified during the City Nature Challenge in the Baltimore region here!

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