A Blue View: Million Pollinator Challenge

Did you know? One out of every three bites of food you eat comes from pollinators. Without them, we wouldn’t have foods like blueberries, apples, chocolate and almonds.

Published June 17, 2015

Unfortunately these animals are facing significant population declines—which is why First Lady Michelle Obama and the National Pollinator Garden Network have made a nationwide call to action to create gardens that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge aims to register a million public and private gardens and landscapes to support pollinators.

Join the movement! Make your backyard pollinator-friendly with these tips:

1. Add Some Native Plants.

By installing native flowering plants that are local to your area you’re providing butterflies with the nectar or foliage they need as adults and caterpillars. 

2. Bring On the Butterflies!

Want to attract butterflies in particular? Choose flowering plants with red, yellow, orange, pink and purple blossoms that are flat-topped or clustered and have short flower tubes.

3. Provide a Water Source.

Give butterflies a puddling area where they can drink water and absorb minerals. All you need is some moist sand that you can place in a shallow pan in the soil of your habitat. 

4. Plant for Continuous Bloom.

Keep flowering plants blooming in your backyard year-round! When one plant stops blooming, try to ensure another begins. 

5. Say No to Insecticides.

Insecticides, as you may have guessed, kill insects—that includes pollinators. Avoid using these products anywhere around your home. 

6. Add a “Rest Area.”

Butterflies need a place to rest and bask in the sun in preparation for flight. Some flat stones will do the trick!  


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