Baltimore's Inner Harbor Receives an F

The Baltimore Harbor Report Card, released today, rated the health of our city’s waters as an F.

by Laura Bankey, Director of Conservation

Published June 04, 2015

baltimores-inner-harbor 

Image via flickr.

If someone asked you to describe the water in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, what would you say?

The words you’d choose might include: dirty, trash-filled, polluted, etc. This sad commentary is fair, considering that people visiting the heart of our city are met with debris floating on the harbor’s surface—debris left behind by citizens throughout the region that floats down local streams and storm drains to the receiving waters.

What they don't see is what is really happening beneath the surface and the diversity of life that our harbor supports. In recent years, the city’s Healthy Harbor initiative has put forth many policies and innovative solutions (like our world-famous trash wheel!) to improve our waters.

In addition to addressing debris and pollution, habitat improvements like floating islands and biohuts are providing homes and sanctuaries for the diverse group of species that call our harbor home.

biohuts-inner-harbor

As we continue to make improvements to our city's infrastructure and develop and deploy innovative technologies to improve water quality and aquatic habitat, we will see more and more benefits.

In addition to the work being done by the local government and partner organizations, the future of the harbor depends on the actions taken by residents, communities, visitors and employees of the city and surrounding area. How we choose to get to work, eat our lunches, treat our backyards and more, has a direct impact on our local environment, harbor included.

We have the power to improve the world we live in!

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